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Higher Education

Higher education impacts society in many ways, most importantly emplyoment. Access to higher education within the black community allows for upward mobility within their socio-economic statuses. Black Canadians regardless of their educational attainment are still subject to unemployment. According to statistics though, unemployment is still commonly higher among black individuals who have no educational attainment past highschool. Creating access allows for the historical segregation to be diminished and opens doors for individuals within the black community.

History of Segregation in Schools

  • History
  • Conditions and School Environment described by the Newspaper
  • Black Medical School Experience

Racial segregation is the separation of people, or groups of people, based on race in everyday life. Throughout Canada’s history, there have been many examples of Black people being segregated, excluded from, or denied equal access to opportunities and services such as education (The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2019). This segregation was enforced by laws, court decisions and historical norms of white supremacy and black subordination.

In the early 19th century, the provincial governments of Ontario and Nova Scotia created legally segregated common schools, also known as public schools (The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2019). In the early 1840s, when the public school structure was being formalized in Canada, Ontario school trustees (who were all white) created separate schools for Black children in certain parts of Ontario, particularly where there were high numbers of freedom seekers (The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2019).

  • The basements of the 1-1/2 story buildings are dark and their walls bear the crayon, pencil and boot marks of many years.
  • The stairs leading up to the classrooms or down to the basement are well-worn and the stairways are narrow.
  • Each building has two toilets, chemical ones that must be flushed out daily with a pail of water in order to keep them minimally sanitary.
  • The closet-like bathroom cubicles smell strongly of wine and chemicals. A pump in the schoolyard is the only source of water.”
  • In Windsor, a Black petitioner observed that 35 Black students were being taught in a 16 x 24-foot coop, while a nearby white school had extra space.

Source: Jamie Bradburn – Published on Feb 26, 2018

Racial segregation and exclusion and segration were not limited to elementary and secondary schooling. Discriminatory practices were also found in post-secondary school institutions as well (The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2019). Universities like: McGill University, Queen’s University, and the University of Toronto, stopped admitting black students due to social and institutional attitudes (The Canadian Encyclopedia, 2019).

  • In 1918, the university senate at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario voted to ban Black students from further admission to the Queen’s medical school program.
  • The University of Toronto denied admission to Black applicants in the 1920s.
  • McGill University went on to adopt racial restrictions in admissions of Black students in the 1920s – 1930s and again from 1945 until the early 1960s.
  • Black medical students in Montreal were also barred from doing their internships at hospitals in Montreal between 1930 and 1947.

Representation

Representation allows for different perspectives at the table. It allows for advocacy and promotes an intersectional way of managing an organization alongside its policies and regulations. It ensures the interest of all people is served.

Fun Fact: A 2018 study found that students who have had at least one same-race teacher over their academic career were 13% more likely to graduate (Lopez, 2020).

Access to Higher Education

Representation allows for different perspectives at the table. It allows for advocacy and promotes an intersectional way of managing an organization alongside its policies and regulations. It ensures the interest of all people is served.

Fun Fact: A 2018 study found that students who have had at least one same-race teacher over their academic career were 13% more likely to graduate (Lopez, 2020).

DID YOU KNOW?

  • Toronto
  • Vancouver
  • Halifax
  • Calgary

Toronto – Education Level Obtained

The portion of black men and women with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Toronto was almost half that of the counterpart population.

Source: StatsCanada

Vancouver– Education Level Obtained

The portion of black men and women with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Toronto was almost half that of the counterpart population.

Source: StatsCanada

Halifax– Education Level Obtained

The portion of black men and women with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Toronto was almost half that of the counterpart population.

Source: StatsCanada

Calgary – Education Level Obtained

The portion of black men and women with a bachelor’s degree or higher in Toronto was almost half that of the counterpart population.

Source: StatsCanada

Educational Resources

The New Jim Crow

By: Michelle Alexander

To better understand the school to prison pipeline and the relationship between our school system and criminal justice system, Alexander’s work is essential reading. You will come away from this book with a clear picture of how systems of oppression toward people of color, and particularly Black Americans, were created and sustained. Before we can change the system, we must first understand where we are and how we got there, this book will help with that.

Available on: Amazon

The Power of the Black Experience in the Classroom

Keith Mayes | TEDxMinneapolis

Keith Mayes makes a compelling case for how the black experience in the classroom could have remarkable impact. Dr. Keith Mayes is an Associate Professor of African American & African Studies at the University of Minnesota and the College of Liberal Arts’ Arthur “Red” Motley Exemplary Teacher. Holding a Ph.D. in History from Princeton University, his professional interests include the Civil Rights and Black Power Movement; education policy and history; black holiday traditions; and racial equity and critical ethnic studies pedagogy. Dr. Mayes authored the book.

Available on: Youtube

So You Want To Talk About Race

By: Ijeoma Oluo

Widespread reporting on aspects of white supremacy — from police brutality to the mass incarceration of Black Americans — has put a media spotlight on racism in our society. Still, it is a difficult subject to talk about. How do you tell your roommate her jokes are racist? Why did your sister-in-law take umbrage when you asked to touch her hair — and how do you make it right? How do you explain white privilege to your white, privileged friend? In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.

Available on: Amazon

I can’t breathe: feeling suffocated by the polite racism in Canada’s graduate schools

By: Karine Coen- Sanchez

By openly sharing our experiences, BIPOC students are growing a space for collaboratively addressing racism in all our spheres of influence – starting from within our departments and disciplines. Those who are dedicated to anti-racist work must continue to listen and to work collaboratively to deconstruct the social structures of whiteness and white supremacy that normalize the suffering of racialized people. Ideally, we must challenge and unscramble anti-racism to reinforce policies and structures in our universities, in our teaching, and in our research, in order to promote the need for systemic change. I no longer want to be the subject of racism; I want to be a bridge that connects two different worlds and two different realities to one common thread of social being.

Black Scholarships, Grants and Awards

NameApplications DeadlineRegionValue
Community Unit Alliance: Director of Black Scholarships Awards10/20/2022Canada$-
Onyx Intiative08/20/2022ON,BC,NS$-
CVCA08/19/2022ON$-
Black Canadian Scholarship Fund01/03/2022BC$x-y
Jamaican Canadian Association Scholarship Program12/01/2022Canada$500
The BBPA Legacy Scholarships11/28/2021Canada$-
Blanche Macdonald's One Million Dollar Scholarships For Black Canadians11/25/2021NS$-

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Ontario Hub

The importance for every individual to have the resources and opportunities for health and wellbeing in order to be able to address systemic health challenges and barriers can never be overemphasized.  As such, we have carefully gathered the following  resources that will be helpful to you and your loved ones. Should you have other resources you would like to share with us for future broadcast, we would be happy to oblige.

Barriers to Employment
Barriers to Employment

Hi FBC fam! To kick off Black History Month FBC is hosting events around employment in the Barriers to Employment in the Federally Regulated Finance Sector. Come join us as we invite HR Professionals who can provide tips about employment opportunities, share their...

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Natalee Johnson

Natalee Johnson is a mother, author, educator, creator, community change agent and advocate for children, youth, women and families. She is an educator, the founder Passion 4 Dreams Inc LJ Legacy Impact Foundation. Natalee is also the author of My Magnificent Hair (2016) and I Come As I Am: Reflections of Verse (Revised 2016).

Natalee advocates for equity, diversity, and inclusion, while ensuring to dismantle anti-Black racism and inequalities. Growing up in the inner city, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, she was labelled an at-risk youth. Natalee chose not to allow labels to determine her future and dictate who I should become. She overcame many challenges, learned to be resilient, and useher skills and knowledge to empower others. As an author, she writes about her lived experience. As an educator, child, youth and family advocate she supports families, children and youth from diverse communities. Natalee has also been featured by the Ministry of Education for Full Day Learning, 2010, College of Early Childhood Educators and Seneca College.

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