Community Building

One of the key functions of the Federal and Provincial governments across Canada, that the FBC aims to utilize, is supporting community building. This is achieved by collaborations across communities from Coast to Coast to Coast to find common ground for coexistence and evaluating financial resources for development. To this end, the Canadian government has funded community development projects from Coast to Coast to Coast. These include over $1.6 billion in support for Ontario municipalities through the Canada Community-Building Fund[11]. These funds are for the development of infrastructure in communities across Canada and to promote health and safety of citizens. In July 2021, Ontario alone received over $850 million through the new federal Canada Community-Building Fund (CCBF) for the 2021–22 fiscal year. There was also a top-up of more than $816 million towards the same cause[12]. These funds help enable Ontarians to carry out infrastructure projects that support their well-being[1].

The CCBF provides all municipalities across the country with a permanent, stable, and indexed source of infrastructure funding[2]. It was made permanent in 2011 at $2 billion per year, and is indexed at 2 per cent per year, starting in 2014-15, with increases to be applied in $100-million increments from 2014-15 to 2023-24[13].

The CCBF is allocated on a per-capita basis for provinces, territories, and First Nations, but provides a base funding amount of 0.75 per cent of total annual funding for Prince Edward Island and each territory[3]. This funding will be administered through renewed bilateral agreements outlining the terms and conditions for the use of the Canada Community-Building Fund. See this link for detailed figures on community building fund allocations Infrastructure Canada – Canada Community-Building Fund Allocation Table


References:

11. Government of Canada, Department of Justice. “About the Criminal Justice System Review.” Government of Canada, Department of Justice, Electronic Communications, 7 July 2021, https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/tcjs-tsjp/index.html.

12. Government of Canada, Department of Justice. “Research in Brief.” Assessments and Analyses of Canada’s Bail System, 17 Dec. 2018, https://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/jr/rib-reb/bail-liberte/index.html.

1.    Jessiman-Perreault, G., & McIntyre, L. (2017). The household food insecurity gradient and potential reductions in adverse population mental health outcomes in Canadian adults. SSM-population health, 3, 464-472.

2.    Men, F., Gundersen, C., Urquia, M. L., & Tarasuk, V. (2020). Association between household food insecurity and mortality in Canada: a population-based retrospective cohort study. CMAJ, 192(3), E53-E60.

13. Government of Canada, Statistics Canada. “Study: A Labour Market Snapshot of Black Canadians during the Pandemic.” The Daily – , 24 Feb. 2021, https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/210224/dq210224b-eng.htm.

3.    Statistics Canada. (2020). Food insecurity during the COVID-19 pandemic, May 2020. Statistics Canada.